Category Archives: 20 Lessons Faith

How To Pray The Acts Method

Prayer a blog by Vince Miller

How To Pray The Acts Method

"Prayer is simply a two-way conversation between you and God."—Billy Graham

"Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will hear you."—Jeremiah 29:12

What Is Prayer?
Prayer is conversing with God, plain and simple. And as our heavenly Father, God wants us to talk to Him about anything, any time, any place, in any frame of mind. So why do we make it so complicated? Brothers, it doesn't have to be hard. Whether you're new to the faith, an old-timer, or somewhere in between, it never hurts to start with a few basics.

Four Steps To Get You Started With A Healthy Prayer Pattern

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Let's begin with an easy way to remember some key ingredients to effective prayer: ACTS. Not the New Testament Book of Acts, but the acronym. ACTS stands for adoration, confession, thanksgiving, and supplication. Seem too formulaic? Hey – my perspective is that any tool we can use to promote and encourage one-on-one intimacy with our Father is a plus. Here's what ACTS is all about:

One | Adoration
You express your adoration for God when you worship Him. You praise Him for His attributes and actions, for who He is and all He has done, is doing, and will do in your life. God enjoys hearing your praise!

"Praise the Lord! Praise the Lord, O my soul! I will praise the Lord as long as I live; I will sing praises to my God while I have my being"—Psalm 146:1-2.

Two | Confession
God already knows, of course, when you've strayed a little or a lot, but to acknowledge it – to agree with God about your wrong attitudes and actions – is to open the door to freedom from guilt and shame. Express sorrow for what you've said, thought, or done that is not pleasing to Him. Pour out your regrets, seeking God's forgiveness. Know and believe in His forgiveness even when you don't feel it. When you confess your sins, you receive God's mercy and cleansing. Confession ushers in a humble heart of gratitude that removes any barriers blocking your communication with our merciful, loving Father.

"If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness"—1 John 1:9.

Three | Thanksgiving
Say "thank you" to God! After all, He took your place on the cross, paying for your sins so that you can live with Him forever in paradise. Because of Him, you hit the biggest jackpot ever, and He gives us His love, protection, and provision to boot. Exercise a stance of gratitude to the One who gives all good gifts. We can (and should!) thank Him for what He teaches us through our hardships, too.

"I will offer to you the sacrifice of thanksgiving and call on the name of the Lord"—Psalm 116:17.

Four | Supplication
Don't be shy. It's okay to pray for what you want and need – and for the needs of others – your family, friends, pastor, leaders, missionaries, government leaders, and persecuted Christians around the world. Ask God for wisdom in every area of your life. Ask for His daily guidance, for courage, hope, and opportunities to serve.

"Let your requests be made known to God"—Philippians 4:6.

Never again do you need to say, "I don't know what to pray." Remember ACTS. I don't know who first thought it up, but a lot of Christian brothers and sisters around the globe use it to make their prayer lives more meaningful and productive. It's a great start to a healthy pattern of prayer.

Vince Miller Speaking All In

Vince Miller is a speaker, author, and mentor to men. He is an authentic and transparent leader who loves to communicate to audiences on the topics of mentorship, fathering, leadership and manhood. He has authored 16 books and small group curriculum for men and is the primary content creator of all Resolute materials. Contact Vince Miller here. His newest book is 20 Lessons That Build A Leader.

Trusting God

God Sprints a daily devotional by Vince Miller

Trusting God

"Having thus chosen our course, without guile and with pure purpose, let us renew our trust in God, and go forward without fear and with manly hearts."—Abraham Lincoln

“Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord."—Jeremiah 17:7

Great Men Trust In A Great God
You'll hear Christians say, sometimes tritely, "just trust in God." And we should trust Him in all things. But what does that mean? And how do you do it?

The prophet Jeremiah speaks to this matter of trust in Jeremiah 17:5-10. He breaks the issue of trust down into its essential elements. He was a man who was driven to trust God is changing times, and trusted Him when others didn't. So let's discover the wisdom from a man who was deeply challenged to trust God and saw its result.

Three Steps To Increasing Your Faith & Trust In God

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First | The wrong place to focus your trust
Thus says the Lord: “Cursed is the man who trusts in man and makes flesh his strength, whose heart turns away from the Lord. He is like a shrub in the desert, and shall not see any good come. He shall dwell in the parched places of the wilderness, in an uninhabited salt land."—Jeremiah 17:5-6

The wrong place to put your trust is in yourselves or other people. Notice the sharp language that Jeremiah uses – "Cursed is the man who trusts in man" because in doing so, his "heart turns away from the Lord." As followers, you have given up the control of your lives to God so to trust in yourself, your plans, and your schemes are not only foolishness, but it's a rejection of the very God who owns your lives, who wants to direct your paths and use you for His purposes. If you now belong to Him but are trusting in yourself, you're actively denying Him the rightful ownership of your life.

The result is that you will not see the prosperity and blessing that God has for your life. He likens those who trust in themselves to a "bush in the wastelands," who "will not see prosperity" but rather dwell in a parched place "where no one lives." It's a picture of living alone and without blessing, because you're living without the direction of God.

Second | The right place to focus your trust
But Jeremiah continues.

“Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord. He is like a tree planted by water, that sends out its roots by the stream,
and does not fear when heat comes, for its leaves remain green, and is not anxious in the year of drought, for it does not cease to bear fruit.”—Jeremiah 17:7-8

Contrast the description we have of the one who trusts in himself with verses seven and eight regarding the blessings you'll experience in believing in the Lord and putting your confidence in him. God is saying, you can trust in yourself and live in the wasteland by yourself, missing my blessings or you can choose to believe in me and live a blessed life like a tree planted by the water, its leaves always green and without the fear of drought. That is a huge contrast in how you live life and how you'll experience the fullness of life.

As the sovereign Lord, God knows what is best for you. He knows what you don't know about the circumstances of your lives. He knows the exact date of your death, and He knows what life will look like tomorrow. He is also the one who can deal with issues of life which seem impossible for you. You like to control your destiny, but in reality, you have very little control—if any especially as a follower (note: follower is the operative word). God, on the other hand, can guide, direct your paths, remove barriers in your way and give you favor with those you interact with. The bottom line, says Jeremiah is that if you want a life that is all it can be, it comes from putting your trust in God rather than in yourself.

Three | Be discerning about where your trust is placed.
"The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it? “I the Lord search the heart and test the mind, to give every man according to his ways, according to the fruit of his deeds.”—Jeremiah 17:9-10

Now you may well be saying, "Of course I trust in God." Yes! How many of us make our plans, do our thing and ask God to bless those plans? That is entirely different from asking Him to give you direction and guidance in the plan itself and to permit Him to actually guide your decisions and plans and not merely to bless your plans.

Jeremiah reminds us that your hearts are deceitful above all things and that the Lord searches your heart, examines your mind, and rewards you accordingly. Wise men are discerning about their motivations and the true desires of their hearts. They can distinguish between trusting themselves and trusting God. They see every new day as a day to put their confidence in God rather than in themselves.

To close another proverb puts it this way.

"Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths."—Proverbs 3:5-6

Vince Miller Speaking All In

Vince Miller is a speaker, author, and mentor to men. He is an authentic and transparent leader who loves to communicate to audiences on the topics of mentorship, fathering, leadership and manhood. He has authored 16 books and small group curriculum for men and is the primary content creator of all Resolute materials. Contact Vince Miller here. His newest book is 20 Lessons That Build A Leader.

The Importance of Bible Study

Respond to Gods Word a mens daily devotional by Vince Miller

The Importance of Bible Study

I want to know one thing, the way to heaven: how to land safe on that happy shore. God himself has condescended to teach the way; for this very end he came from heaven. He has written it down in a book! Oh, give me that book! At any price, give me the book of God! I have it: here is knowledge enough for me. Let me be: “A man of one book.”—John Wesley

"Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path."— Psalm 119:105

We Are Buying Them, But We Aren't Reading Them
Many who are followers of Christ today confess that they are not familiar with scripture. The statistics on this are actually alarming. Many Christians regardless of their spiritual age tend to leave matters of observation, interpretation, and application of the scripture up to their pastors, trained professionals, supplemental books, or sermons rather than digging into the Bible on their own. But the Bible, unsurpassed as the best selling book of all time, was meant to be read, studied, and understood by the general population not exclusively church leaders. We're all called to be students of the scriptures. Yet for many, it's not a lack of interest, but rather the intimidation factor of the book as it's unlike any other book a person will ever read. It was written by 40 authors, over two thousand years, to people in times we did not live. It's not a common reader like the business, self-help, or fiction books you find on the shelf today. Yet God wants you to uncover its mysteries and truth. And here's how.

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Just Read The Whole Thing
Yes, I am suggesting that you read the whole Bible. The whole way through, as painful as it might be. A surprising number of Christians never regularly read parts of the Bible, much less the whole thing. Yet it's the central message of their faith. If that is you, then you to find a One-Year Bible Reading Plans and read through the Bible so that you have some frame of reference for the entire book. The best way to do this is to partner with a man or a few other men and read it over one-year together. Yes, a year is a long time, but with other men it becomes a lot more interesting, inviting, and invigorating. It's like working out together, you may read some on your own, but with accountability from other men, you might hang in there all way through one entire year. Along the way, you will have the opportunity to discuss what you are reading and encourage each other in the journey. Together you will experience a sense of accomplishment, accountability and an appreciation for scripture that only comes from diving in. Some men I know repeat this annually, using a different version of the Bible for a change of pace that keeps it fresh.

After you do this, or maybe while you are doing this, you can dive in a little deeper. And here is how:

First | Read an entire book in the Bible
Here's what I mean. The Bible is one book with 66 books within it. 39 are Old Testament books and 27 are New Testament books. Each of these books, for the most part, are independent writings written for specific people at specific times. Choose one to read and read it entirely. For instance, you are going to study through the Gospel of John, start by reading the whole Gospel once or twice in order to get an overview of the book. Getting a picture of the whole is just as important as taking portions for further study. This gives you a strong context for the characters, storyline, genres, styles, tone, and themes of the book. While you could consult a commentary on this subject, you don't need it in most cases. Simply take notes, write down learnings, ask questions, follow the people, the tension, and take in the fuller context. Most fail to do this and therefore make a critical error in understanding what the writer intended to mean, infer, and thus make wrong personal application to their life. But you have to have a context before you start interpreting and applying the lessons of the text otherwise you will end up drawing misaligned conclusions.

Second | Focus on drawing meaning from a section
Take a section, as your Bible outlines it, for one study, and dig into what the author wanted the original audience to know when they wrote that portion to them. Notice what was said there. Remember your Bible was not written for you, it was written by an author to people in their day and time. Because of this they would have heard and understood things differently than you would today. Their culture, customs, and practices were very different from our, therefore, each text has an intended meaning to them. And this is what we are wanting to discover.

Most Bibles have section headings, often two to three per chapter which delineates Scriptural paragraphs that fit together into a specific topic. In daily Scripture study, it is valuable to work through a specific book of Scripture a section at a time. For each section, read it thoroughly and ask yourself the question – "What did the author want the people of their day to understand through this teaching?"

To put it another way, there is a reason that God included what is written in our Bibles. If you can answer the question as to what the writer wanted us to know, you will be better able to answer the next question.

Third | Discover the application
Here is where the Scriptures get personal. Paul tells Timothy that, "All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness." So, ask yourself the questions.

  • Is the text teaching me in some way?
  • Is the text rebuking me in some way?
  • Is the text correcting me in some way?
  • Is the text training me in some way?

This is where a journal becomes very useful. Jot down any observations you made as you considered what the author intended to convey and then specific applications for your life. Speaking of jotting things down, make the Bible yours by marking it up, making notes, underlining portions that are especially meaningful to you. There are pens that are made for writing in the margins or underlining that don't bleed through and you will remember what you have studied much better if you make notes as you go whether in your journal or in your Bible. Or maybe try both.

You will encounter hard sayings or difficult passages to understand and in those cases, you may want to purchase a commentary—many are very easy to read and not technical. Be careful, however, to first do your own study and make your own observations rather than reading the commentary instead of the Biblical text. The longer you study the Bible the more you will understand, and you will start to see themes that run through the Bible.

Four | Ask for insight
Because the Holy Spirit leads us into all truth (see John 14), specifically ask the Holy Spirit to reveal to you what He wants you to understand and apply. Scripture study for the building knowledge that excludes spiritual transformation is a missed opportunity. Knowledge is good for awareness and personal pride, but devoid of personal and spiritual transformation it leaves us wanting for more. God gave us the word for the purpose of transformation which moves us toward reconciliation and redemption in our world.

If you feel that you need some initial help in studying the Bible on a regular basis, find another guy who does it regularly and asks him to mentor you for a time. Study some passages together so that you start to feel comfortable doing it yourself. At the end of your life you will never regret the time and effort you put into studying God's Word, or the difference it made in your life.

Vince Miller Founder of ResoluteVince Miller is a speaker, author, and mentor to men. He is an authentic and transparent leader who loves to communicate to audiences on the topics of mentorship, fathering, leadership and manhood. He has authored 13 books and small group curriculum for men and is the primary content creator of all Resolute materials. Contact Vince Miller here. His newest book is Thirty Virtues That Build A Man.

How To Meditate On God’s Word

How To Meditate on Gods Word a blog by Vince Miller

How To Meditate On God's Word

Four questions about meditation and the steps to help you start.

The Scriptures talk a great deal about meditation, especially in the Books of Wisdom like Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Job. But what does meditation mean, what happens when I do it, what are the benefits and how do I do it? www.bible.org defines meditation this way:

"Meditation in the Bible means reflective thinking on biblical, truth so that God can speak to us through Scripture and through the thoughts that come to mind as we are reflecting on the Word, but that must also be filtered by the Word."

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What Is Meditation?
In other words, meditation is the practice of taking a verse or many verses and then contemplating, deliberating and mulling over those verses and their implications for our lives in the course of a few minutes, a day, or longer. As we consider the biblical truth, God's voice has the opportunity to enlighten us on how that truth applies to our lives.

What Happens When We Meditate?
Meditation has the potential to bring ongoing transformation to our lives over time. Paul exhorts us in Romans 12:2, "Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God's will is – His good, pleasing and perfect will." As we meditate on specific passages in God's word, the truths of that passage become resident in our minds and once "in residence" they influence our thinking and our actions.

Consider, for instance, Micah 6:8. "He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?" Think of all the biblical truths packed into that one verse and the many implications it has for our lives. I would encourage you to meditate on that one verse this coming week as a test drive for how God's word can become resident in your life over the course of the week. Meditate on it, pray on it, and act on it as situations present themselves.

What Are The Benefits Of Meditation?
Scripture mentions many ways that meditation helps us live out our Christian lives in ways that please God:

  • It focuses our minds (Ps 119:15)
  • It helps us better understand (Ps 119:27)
  • It helps us remember God's faithfulness to us (Ps 143:5)
  • It facilitates worship (Ps 1:2)
  • It helps us apply God's Word (Titus 3:3-4)

All of these allow the Word of God to take up residence in our hearts and lives, adjust our mindset to God's thinking, and help us live out the truths on a daily basis.

How Do I Start?
A simple way to facilitate meditation is to take the verse, or verses, from the Men's Daily Devotional for the day and print them out for the car, your desk at work and wherever you spend your time. And ask Jesus to transform your mind, thinking and life as you meditate on his eternal word.

"Worry is focused thinking on something negative. Meditation is doing the same thing only focusing on God's word instead of your problem." Rick Warren, author, speaker, and pastor of Saddleback Church.

Vince Miller Founder of ResoluteVince Miller is a speaker, author, and mentor to men. He is an authentic and transparent leader who loves to communicate to audiences on the topics of mentorship, fathering, leadership and manhood. He has authored 13 books and small group curriculum for men and is the primary content creator of all Resolute materials. Contact Vince Miller here. His newest book is Thirty Virtues That Build A Man.

How To Memorize Scripture

How To Memorize Scripture a blog by Vince Miller

How To Memorize Scripture

“The Bible in the memory is better than the Bible in the bookcase.”—Charles Haddon Spurgeon

"I have stored up your word in my heart, that I might not sin against you."—Psalm 119:11

I Want To Memorize Scripture But Not Sure I Can
If you are anything like me, you struggle to memorize anything. However, over the years, I have gotten exceedingly better at memorizing scripture— even entire chapters of the text. And for most, scripture memorization feels like a daunting task. And the older you get, the less you feel confident you can pull it off. It's a discipline most desire but don't know how to tackle.

Four Steps To Memorizing Scripture

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One | Learn The Context
The first tip is to study the verse or verses you want to memorize in their context. The context helps you understand the fuller concept of the verse. Verses don't stand alone – with the exception perhaps of a few of the Proverbs. Every verse has a context. The context provides you an understanding of the characters, the setting, and the context which gives you a visual image to memorize along with the words—which aids retention.

So, for instance, John 3:16, unquestionably the most famous verse in the Bible, is not a standalone verse. It's a moment of tension in a critical story where Jesus is discussing eternal life as Jesus engages with a religious man named Nicodemus. Knowing this not only helps you understand John 3:16, but it also enables you to remember that this verse contains a key learning on new life in Christ with a person who was religious but struggled with understanding the more in-depth teaching of Jesus. While you may memorize the text, you also now have a context for the story. The context reinforces the memory of the words. They are both words and a story that is full of emotion, tension, and truth.

Two | Break Verse Into Phrases
When you start memorizing the verse and now take into consideration its context, the next step is to break the verse down into bite-size phrases. Memorization includes savoring the phrases, understanding them, internalizing them and meditating on them. Think about these phrases that make up John 3:16.

For God so loved the world,
that he gave his only Son,
that whoever believes in him
should not perish
but have eternal life.

Rather than mindlessly trying to memorize the verse, it is far better to meditate on each of the phrases that make up the verse, thinking of their meaning and in this way internalize the verse until it is not only memorized, but it's meaning instilled in our minds. Using this methodology, you can remember any verse without focusing on the memorization but the meaning. The memorization becomes a byproduct of your meditating.

Three | Use The Verses
One of the keys to retention is to use what you have memorized as often as possible until it becomes fixed in your thinking, action, and behavior. Practice, for instance, using the verse or verses memorized in prayer. Write them in your journal. If you have an accountability partner or mentor, share them. Repeat them silently to yourself. Use them as passwords, for example, "FGsltwthghoStwbihsnpbhel-J316" is a pretty secure password and it's easy for you to remember—eventually. Everyone learns differently so try using various tactics as you try to memorize the text. As you do, recall the context that the verse(s) are found, and remind yourself of the larger picture.

Meditation is a crucial outcome of using the verses as mentioned above. Meditation infers we are thinking about it, and the various ways it applies to our everyday life. Remember that your goal is not how many verses one can memorize but how well you can use the verse to your life. Taking verses you have learned and reflected on their application to your life is a key both to remembering and to applying. The more you think about what you have implanted through memorization, the more insights you will have for your own life, which leads right into the last principle.

Four | Be Changed
We are called to use scripture to renew the mind. And there is no better way to renew our minds than by saturating it with God's Word. Our brains are wired to assimilate vast amounts of information, and those pieces of information create neuron pathways for good or for evil that are not easy to change. If we fill our minds with lies, our brains develop paths that desire more distortion. If we fill our minds with God's Word, our brains create essential pathways that are life-giving rather than life-stealing.

David writes in Psalm 119:36, "Incline my heart to your testimonies, and not to selfish gain!" There are many trivial things we can load into our mind. God's word implanted there renews our lives, actions, and behaviors. So don't only memorize the words, apply it. Live it. In the case of John 3:16, you might choose today to believe in Him when it seems unreasonable, challenging, or even uncomfortable—like it was for Nicodemus. Maybe you need to take your belief to the next level? Apply it. Live it. Try it, and be changed.

Vince Miller Speaking All In

Vince Miller is a speaker, author, and mentor to men. He is an authentic and transparent leader who loves to communicate to audiences on the topics of mentorship, fathering, leadership and manhood. He has authored 16 books and small group curriculum for men and is the primary content creator of all Resolute materials. Contact Vince Miller here. His newest book is Thirty Virtues That Build A Man.

Why Studying Scripture Is Important In A Man’s Life

Study Scripture Is Important a blog by Vince Miller Mens Ministry

Why Studying Scripture Is Important In A Man’s Life

“The Bible is the book of my life. It's the book I live with, the book I live by, the book I want to die by.”—N. T. Wright

All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work"—2 Timothy 3:14-17.

Why Do I Need to Study The Scripture
You know the drill! You've probably been told that you need to study Scripture regularly, but why? Isn't attending church and occasionally visiting a small group enough—so why is it so important to read and study the Bible yourself? It's a great and vital question. And many of the answers are found in these word of the Apostle Paul.

In Romans 12:1-2, Paul writes, "I appeal to you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect."

Three Reasons You Should Study Scripture

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One | Scripture transforms your minds and lives.
When Paul tells you not to conform any longer to the pattern of this world, he is reminding you that the design of the world, or the way the world thinks, is different from how God thinks. In almost every field of life; marriage, sexuality, ethics, finances, priorities, and the list could go on, God's teaching is in opposition with what the world considers truth. Paul suggests the solution to this conflict is subjecting your mind to renewal by testing the opinions of the world against God's truth. And this is where scripture comes in.

In a letter to his protégé, Timothy, Paul reminds him of the importance of scripture in his life.

"But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work"—2 Timothy 3:14-17.

It's the Scriptures that plums your thinking against truth and renews your mind. It's God's way of constantly reminding you of His perspective on truth, life, and godliness. God's Word shows you the path, when you get off the path, how to get back on the path, and how to stay on the path. And every time you discover new truths from God's Word and apply them, you discover freedom because living a life of truth keeps you from the traps along the path of life. With this perspective, you find out scripture requires a daily process that guides you to your freedom in Christ. And who doesn't want that? Like breathing induces oxygen to our lungs, scripture induces truth to our lives. It's God's breath (or oxygen), that encourages, corrects, trains, teaches, and convicts so that we are equipped "for every good work."

Two | The Holy Spirit works in unison with the scripture.
As Christ followers, we are empowered by something others do not possess—the Holy Spirit. As the third person of the Godhead, He is our counselor who guides us into all truth because He is the "Spirit of truth"—John 14:17. When you combine the truth of God's Word with the Spirit of Truth who convicts you according to God's Word and guides you to apply it, you have a powerful God-given combination that ushers in change.

This dynamic is addressed in Hebrews 4:12-13. "For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And no creature is hidden from his sight, but all are naked and exposed to the eyes of him to whom we must give account." Scriptures are living and active because God breath and the Holy Spirit within you is present as you read, reflect, and study them. And it's this Spirit that reinforces the truth of Scripture to penetrate your desires, thoughts, and behaviors.

Three | You encounter God in scripture.
Time spent in God's Word is not the same as in other books you might read or study. When you read scripture, you get the pleasure of encountering God. And as you meet God, you are changed by an unchanging God who possesses timeless truth. And in the process, you become more like Him. This is a living, dynamic encounter with God. The more time you spend with Him, the more opportunities you have to renew your mind and become like Him in how you think, feel, and behave.

How many times have you wished that you could sit down with Jesus face to face and ask Him questions? Gain his wisdom? Ask his advice? Or receive his encouragement? Every time you open scripture that's what is happening. Truth is there. Encouragement is there. Wisdom is there. And, God is there. Don't miss out on what could be the best part of your day and life. Start with even a little bit of scripture every day.

Vince Miller Speaking All In

Vince Miller is a speaker, author, and mentor to men. He is an authentic and transparent leader who loves to communicate to audiences on the topics of mentorship, fathering, leadership and manhood. He has authored 16 books and small group curriculum for men and is the primary content creator of all Resolute materials. Contact Vince Miller here. His newest book is Thirty Virtues That Build A Man.

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