Category Archives: 20 Lessons Fitness

Training in Godliness

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Training in Godliness

I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.'—Muhammad Ali

"For while bodily training is of some value, godliness is of value in every way, as it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come."—1 Timothy 4:8

Can you imagine pushing through a 25-hour-per-week training regimen of swimming, biking, and running for an entire year with no particular goal in mind? Why would a guy do that? Most wouldn't, I'm guessing. But anyone serious about competing in the Ironman Triathlon just might. When the day of the big event arrives, you're facing a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride, and a marathon run of 26 miles and 385 yards. That's the goal—to compete, finish the race, and possibly even win. Only one person can win, of course, but even to just finish would yield a moment or two of personal accomplishment and glory. Indeed, physical training has its rewards. But (there's always a "but") what about your heart, mind, and soul? What about the part of you that is eternal?

One | Right Comparisons in Training

"Bodily training is of some value," Paul writes to Timothy, "but godliness is of value in every way." 

Don't get me wrong. I will always advocate taking good care of your physical body, practicing good health habits, eating right, and getting a decent amount of sleep and exercise. We come in assorted shapes and sizes and all manner of imperfection, but God calls us to be good stewards of everything He's given us, and that would include our "earth suits." After all, God's Holy Spirit dwells there.

"Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body."—1 Corinthians 6:19-20

It's not that we should neglect our bodies to focus our attention exclusively on spiritual health and growth. It is, however, a matter of priorities. Take care of our bodies, yes, but even more, nurture our hearts and exercise our minds to know and love God better and better. The benefit is long-term. There is real eternal value in a spiritual investment.

Two | Right Balance in Training

There is, in the comparison, some implied extremism. Caring only for the body and not the spirit is to miss the point of the passage. To be a fitness fanatic is to turn fitness into a god and to miss the real thing, God Himself. But caring only for the spirit and not the body is reckless and irresponsible. True, there are physical maladies, frailties, and limitations we can't prevent or control. But it just makes sense that we can maximize our effectiveness for Christ when we pay proper attention to our physical health. So how does one strike the best balance between physical and spiritual training? 

It's a matter of daily discipline. We must do both. And if we're really creative, we can combine the two. Pray while you jog. Dig into God's Word while you rest. Share the Gospel over a nutritious meal. You get the idea. This is entirely doable, guys.

Three | Right Priorities in Training

It is possible to overdo almost anything, of course—be it food, friends, finances, fitness—the list goes on. It's all about our priorities. But there is one thing that is absolutely impossible to overdo. And it's the key to everything. Here it is—are you ready for this? The key to ensuring that our priorities are in order is our complete and total focus on God. Call it an obsession if you will. When we are meditating on God's Word or kneeling in prayer, He is our focus. And when our primary motive in going for a jog or lifting weights is the care and maintenance of God's temple, He is our focus. Why do we make it so hard when it really is as simple as that?

So we train both physically and spiritually. Both are important—both matter. If we err to one side or the other, let's err to the spiritual side. But through it all, let's keep the main thing the main thing. God must remain our focus. Period. 

At the end of the race waits a forever paradise with the King of the universe. And the big win is not that we finish first. The big win is that we break that yellow tape arm in arm with as many fellow human beings as possible. 

So ready, set, go—see you at the finish line.

Vince-Miller-Bio-Pic-2019

Vince Miller is an author and speaker to men around the world on topics that include manhood, masculinity, fatherhood, mentorship, and leadership. He has authored 18 different books for men and is hosted on major video platforms like RightNow Media and Faithlife TV. He hosts a weekly podcast, writes weekly articles, and provides daily thoughts from God's Word all just for men. He is a 27-year ministry veteran and the founder of Resolute a Men's Ministry Platform that provides bible studies aimed at building better men found at www.beresolute.org. See his latest book and small group study Called to Act: 5 Uncomplicated Disciplines for Men.

Training-in-Godliness-a-blog-by-Vince-Miller

Rest

Finding Rest a daily devotional by Vince Miller of Mens Ministry

Rest

"I have the habit of attention to such excess, that my senses get no rest—but suffer from a constant strain."—Henry David Thoreau

"And he said, 'My presence will go with you, and I will give you rest.'" —Exodus 33:14

Fitness experts tell us that regimens of physical training with no built-in breathers can counteract all of an athlete's hard work. Too little rest can make a man crabby; render him more susceptible to injury; induce adrenal fatigue, thereby increasing the production of the fat-storing hormone cortisol; hamper his sleep cycle (which then introduces another whole set of health problems); compromise his immune system; and mess with his performance level (and I don't mean just on the track, court, or playing field). Our efforts to serve God well and grow spiritually also must be punctuated by periods of rest. I'm not advocating laziness, but I also do not suggest that we emulate the guy who never sits down. Too often, we worship the god of activity rather than the God who gives us rest. In short, there are times in life that call for a little self-care.

One | You may need rest

Do not, and I repeat do not, wait to rest until you begin to observe the tell-tale signs that you need it. By then, you're overdue. I'm talking about things like physical fatigue, loss of passion for spiritual activity, feeling far from God, lack of the desire to serve—you get the picture. Indeed, when we are ambushed by a symptom or two, we should not hesitate to step back for a bit. But even better, we ought to anticipate our need for rest and make it a regular part of our routine. We do so at the invitation of Jesus Himself, as quoted in Matthew's gospel:

"Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest."—Matthew 11:28

Two | You may need relaxation

Meditation on God's Word is good for us all. Picture yourself stretched out on a poolside lounge relaxing with a good book. Why not make it The Good Book? 

Any time we find a quiet place of solitude to lose ourselves in Scripture can be incredibly refreshing. We hear a lot about having a daily "quiet time" with God, and some of us have made that a habit, but just because it's become a bit of a cliché in Christian circles doesn't mean it should be dismissed out of hand. I highly recommend it. It's cliché because it works!

But there are myriad other worthwhile ways to relax as well. Putter in the garage, engage in a hobby, read the funny pages, doze on the couch—take a little time and do it. You may be so busy that you have to actually schedule it, but that's okay. Just make sure you don't neglect it.

Three | You may need recreation

Sometimes it is good just to play. And I do mean play. 

There's some overlap with relaxation, I suppose, but I think of playing as something that requires a little more energy. Board games or card games with friends or family are great—even if they do sort of straddle the fence between relaxing and playing. If you're a dad, roughhouse with the kids. Play golf, or tennis, or softball. Go fishing or hiking. Take the family to a theme park—or to the splash pad just around the corner. I bet you could brainstorm a list of 20 fun ways to play in about as many seconds.

Rest, relaxation, recreation—all are forms of the kind of break from the routine we need for maximum physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health. The fitness experts are right. Rest is biblical. And it's essential. God set a precedent:

"And on the seventh day God finished His work that He had done, and He rested on the seventh day from all His work that He had done."—Genesis 2:2

And Jesus encourages it:

"And He said to them (His disciples), 'Come away by yourselves to a desolate place and rest awhile.' For many were coming and going, and they had no leisure even to eat. And they went away in the boat to a desolate place by themselves."—Mark 6:31-32

So what should be our response? Get some rest!

Vince-Miller-Bio-Pic-2019

Vince Miller is an author and speaker to men around the world on topics that include manhood, masculinity, fatherhood, mentorship, and leadership. He has authored 18 different books for men and is hosted on major video platforms like RightNow Media and Faithlife TV. He hosts a weekly podcast, writes weekly articles, and provides daily thoughts from God's Word all just for men. He is a 27-year ministry veteran and the founder of Resolute a Men's Ministry Platform that provides bible studies aimed at building better men found at www.beresolute.org. See his latest book and small group study Called to Act: 5 Uncomplicated Disciplines for Men.

Finding Rest a daily devotional by Vince Miller of Mens Ministry

The Race

The-Race-a-blog-by-Vince-Miller

The Race

"I always loved running…it was something you could do by yourself, and under your own power. You could go in any direction, fast or slow as you wanted, fighting the wind if you felt like it, seeking out new sights just on the strength of your feet and the courage of your lungs."—Jesse Owens

"Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one receives the prize? So run that you may obtain it. Every athlete exercises self-control in all things. They do it to receive a perishable wreath, but we an imperishable. So I do not run aimlessly; I do not box as one beating the air."—1 Corinthians 9:24-26

I love how Paul sees the spiritual life and the spiritual race as he communicates the importance of discipline to the Corinthian church. His comparison is obvious, but how do we do it?

One | Get A Goal

It's a given. Few athletes would train for or compete in a race if there's no goal at the end—no prize for winning. In this letter to the Corinthians, Paul encourages believers to run the race so that we may obtain not a perishable prize, but an imperishable one. Back in his day, winners of races received wreaths (rather than brass trophies or cash purses) that eventually would wither and dry up. It's a great metaphor, but what is Paul really talking about? What was the imperishable prize he had in his sights? Consider the context. Just a few lines earlier in his letter, Paul writes:

"What then is my reward? That in my preaching I may present the gospel free of charge…"—1 Corinthians 9:18

He goes on to write:

"I have become all things to all people, that by all means I might save some. I do it all for the sake of the gospel, that I may share with them in its blessings."—1 Corinthians 9:22-23

So yes, we train and discipline ourselves to grow in righteousness and in our relationship with God, but beyond that, Paul's ultimate aim was to spread the gospel and win people for Christ.

Two | Get Self-Control

"Every athlete exercises self-control in all things," Paul writes. So the comparison to an athlete training for and competing in a race continues. The athlete consumes a healthy diet. And we, as Christian men, nurture our hearts and minds with God's Word. The athlete works out. And we meditate on Scripture and drop to our knees in prayer. The athlete maintains sharp mental focus. So we focus on the Lord in everything we do. The athlete makes personal sacrifices to keep his eyes on the prize. Paul writes in 1 Corinthians 9 that he sacrifices his rights as an apostle to eliminate "any obstacle in the way of the gospel of Christ" (1 Corinthians 9:12). 

What is your regimen of spiritual disciplines? What are you willing to sacrifice for the sake of the gospel?

"But I discipline my body and keep it under control, lest after preaching to others I myself should be disqualified."—1 Corinthians 9:27

Three | Get Perseverance

None of this is easy. Athletes train for a race and run it with dogged determination. We, too, must be doggedly persistent. We must persevere. Our spiritual muscles may burn, and we may have to take a punch or two, but do we quit? Nope. Instead, we lean in. We don't give up. We pace ourselves. Among our most significant challenges along the way, perhaps, will be to achieve a healthy balance in our lives. Think about your typical week. If you're like a lot of guys, you work a minimum of 40 hours a week; you commute to your job, you run errands, you tend to a few chores around the house, you spend time with your family, you eat, and, oh yeah, occasionally you sleep. How do you squeeze in any spiritual discipline?

I have two words for you: intentionality and planning

But don't forget that as believers, as brothers in Christ, we have the best cheering section ever‚—better than any athlete's biggest fans. We have the Lord. Like Paul says:

"I can do all things through Him who strengthens me."—Philippians 4:13

Amen to that, brother!

Vince-Miller-Bio-Pic-2019

Vince Miller is an author and speaker to men around the world on topics that include manhood, masculinity, fatherhood, mentorship, and leadership. He has authored 18 different books for men and is hosted on major video platforms like RightNow Media and Faithlife TV. He hosts a weekly podcast, writes weekly articles, and provides daily thoughts from God's Word all just for men. He is a 27-year ministry veteran and the founder of Resolute a Men's Ministry Platform that provides bible studies aimed at building better men found at www.beresolute.org. See his latest book and small group study Called to Act: 5 Uncomplicated Disciplines for Men.

The-Race-a-blog-by-Vince-Miller

Your Temple

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Your Temple

I still enjoy watching a batter successfully cross home plate, but nothing thrills me more than seeing the Holy Spirit at work in hearts as the Gospel is carried into stadiums, across the airwaves, and around the world.—Billy Graham

Most of us live in some type of dwelling place—a house, an apartment, a trailer, a tent—someplace we call "home." If you're a fisherman, you might live on a boat. If you're a forest ranger, you might live in a cabin. If you're a king, you might live in a palace. But where does the Holy Spirit live? A lot closer than you think. The Holy Spirit lives in you. Did you get that? The Holy Spirit lives in you. Take a look at Paul's letter to the people in Corinth.

"Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body."—1 Corinthians 6:19-20

One | The Spirit lives in you

Think about the roles God's Spirit performs in our lives. For one thing, He is our helper, and He helps us in myriad ways:

"And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Helper, to be with you forever, even the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees Him nor knows Him. You know Him, for He dwells with you and will be in you."—John 14:16-17

"But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, He will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you."—John 14:26

"Nevertheless, I tell you the truth: it is to your advantage that I go away, for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you. But if I go, I will send Him to you. And when He comes, He will convict the world concerning sin and righteousness and judgment."—John 16:7-8

And He gives us the power to be witnesses for Jesus:

"But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth."—Acts 1:8

He strengthens us when we are weak:

"Likewise, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. For we do not know what to pray for as we ought, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groanings too deep for words. And He who searches hearts knows what is the mind of the Spirit, because the Spirit intercedes for the saints according to the will of God."—Romans 8:26-27

The Holy Spirit is an incredible resource for us in many ways and on many levels. So what better place is there for Him to reside than within us as believers? It's genius. We have total access to the greatest (unlimited) power in the universe all the time. And that's by design—it's the way God wants it. Kind of blows your mind, doesn't it?

Two | The body is now God's

Yet here's another mind-bender. Paul says we are "not our own," God owns us. It's a good thing God is full of love, grace, mercy, and wisdom because He owns us. We were bought and paid for by the blood of Jesus. He is our Savior, indeed, but He also is our Lord, our Master. When we misuse or abuse our bodies, we are messing with someone else's property—and that someone else just happens to be Creator and Ruler of the universe. Think about that the next time you're tempted to engage in an activity, you know to be wrong in God's eyes. At the same time, however, don't forget that you have direct access to all the power you need to resist that temptation.

Three | The body is for God's Glory

As much as we'd like to enjoy a little personal glory now and then, it's just no longer an option. We belong to God, so every accomplishment and accolade belongs to Him. There's nothing wrong with pursuing excellence—with doing marvelous things in excellent ways—but perspective is everything, here. What's our motive? Are we in it for the glory it brings to ourselves, or are we in it to bring glory to God?

When Solomon built the Temple of the Lord in Old Testament Israel, he did so according to God's exacting standards and specifications. Gifted craftsmen used only the very finest timber, precious metals, and other materials to erect the magnificent structure. When it was completed, God said to Solomon:

"I have heard your prayer and your plea, which you have made before Me. I have consecrated this house that you have built, by putting My name there forever. My eyes and my heart will be there for all time."—1 Kings 9:3

Today, God has chosen your body, and my body, to be His holy temple. I admit that we may grow weary of what seems to us like frailties and imperfections in our bodies, but God has nonetheless chosen this earthly shell we inhabit as the dwelling place for His Holy Spirit. So with His help, let us strive every day to treat our bodies as the Temple of God – and live accordingly.

Vince-Miller-Bio-Pic-2019

Vince Miller is an author and speaker to men around the world on topics that include manhood, masculinity, fatherhood, mentorship, and leadership. He has authored 18 different books for men and is hosted on major video platforms like RightNow Media and Faithlife TV. He hosts a weekly podcast, writes weekly articles, and provides daily thoughts from God's Word all just for men. He is a 27-year ministry veteran and the founder of Resolute a Men's Ministry Platform that provides bible studies aimed at building better men found at www.beresolute.org. See his latest book and small group study Called to Act: 5 Uncomplicated Disciplines for Men.

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Intentional Effort

Intentional-Effort-a-blog-by-Vince-Miller

Intentional Effort

Never give in. Never give in. Never, never, never, never—in nothing, great or small, large or petty—never give in, except to convictions of honor and good sense.—Winston Churchill

You've heard it before: aim at nothing, and you'll end up hitting nothing. 

Anything we accomplish in life requires intentionality. We set goals for ourselves—in our jobs, in our daily lives—to determine a direction. We make to-do lists of what we think will be essential to complete and check them off, and when we do, we feel a sense of gratification, and maybe pride, when we reach our goals. Why should our approach to spiritual goals be any different? 

But to be intentional means we have to exercise a little discipline. Paul likens it to training as an athlete.

"So I do not run aimlessly; I do not box as one beating the air. But I discipline my body and keep it under control, lest after preaching to others I myself should be disqualified."—1 Corinthians 9:26-27

One | We run with purpose

A lot of people, consciously or subconsciously, believe in a cause-and-effect dynamic to most everything. In other words, "you get back what you put in" an idea loosely based in the Laws of Reciprocity, which in a nutshell states that "whatever you put out into the universe will eventually find its way back to you." 

But this isn't our Christian worldview—not at all. We hold that God alone controls the universe, the world, and everything in it. As imperfect beings, however, we do recognize that the way we live can result in negative consequences for ourselves and sometimes for others. But we are motivated by God's grace and directed by His Holy Spirit knowing we should put effort into living our lives to fulfill His purpose and spread His good news of the Gospel—to give our "all," a championship effort, to (as I like to say) to live "all in." 

Look at what Paul wrote in a letter to the church at Colossae:

"And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of His will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to Him: bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God; being strengthened with all power, according to His glorious might, for all endurance and patience with joy; giving thanks to the Father, who has qualified you to share in the inheritance of the saints in light. He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of His beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins."—Colossians 1:9-14

Two | Discipline is needed

This means as "spiritual athletes in training" then, we must commit to disciplines that work in unison with the Holy Spirit. We cannot ignore the needed discipline. Read what Paul says:

"Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one receives the prize? So run that you may obtain it."—1 Corinthians 9:24

As we know, old habits die hard, so it benefits us to work out every single day. We must build up our resistance to sin, develop the capacity to say "no," and to improve the way we run with daily discipline. To the Romans, Paul wrote:

"Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, to make you obey its passions. Do not present your members to sin as instruments for unrighteousness, but present yourselves to God as those who have been brought from death to life, and your members to God as instruments for righteousness. For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace."—Romans 6:12-14

Word of warning! God's grace does not, of course, give us a license to sin! Notice what Paul also states:

"What then? Are we to sin because we are not under law but under grace? By no means! Do you not know that if you present yourselves to anyone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin, which leads to death, or of obedience, which leads to righteousness? But thanks be to God, that you who were once slaves of sin have become obedient from the heart to the standard of teaching to which you were committed, and, having been set free from sin, have become slaves of righteousness."—Romans 6:15-18

Discipline is needed as we run the spiritual race.

Three | Never disqualified

Our belief is founded in the grace God extends, evidenced by the effort we give. While our effort does not save us, it is evidence of our radical belief. It's only by the power of the Holy Spirit, however, that we can walk a Christ-like walk. Still, it's a choice we must make every day, to keep turning our hearts (and bodies) to live according to God's promises.

"For this very reason, make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue, and virtue with knowledge, and knowledge with self-control, and self-control with steadfastness, and steadfastness with godliness, and godliness with brotherly affection, and brotherly affection with love. For if these qualities are yours and are increasing, they keep you from being ineffective or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ."—2 Peter 1:5-8

God sees our hearts and our desire to please Him, and even in our weakest moments, He never gives up on us. So we must stand firm and never give up on ourselves. With the help of the Holy Spirit, we persevere—and like Paul, we are never disqualified.

Vince-Miller-Bio-Pic-2019

Vince Miller is an author and speaker to men around the world on topics that include manhood, masculinity, fatherhood, mentorship, and leadership. He has authored 18 different books for men and is hosted on major video platforms like RightNow Media and Faithlife TV. He hosts a weekly podcast, writes weekly articles, and provides daily thoughts from God's Word all just for men. He is a 27-year ministry veteran and the founder of Resolute a Men's Ministry Platform that provides bible studies aimed at building better men found at www.beresolute.org. See his latest book and small group study Called to Act: 5 Uncomplicated Disciplines for Men.

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Present Your Bodies

Man-Worshipping-a-blog-by-Vince-Miller

Present Your Bodies

If ever there was abundant evidence of an intelligent Creator and a Designer, it is in the human body. Have you ever given much thought to the beauty of the body’s complexity, with a heart inexplicably beating more than 115,000 times a day to pump life-sustaining blood throughout every cell of this mean machine we inhabit here on earth? It’s a gift from God, for sure. But the body’s real power is not just in any physical strength it might possess. Rather, it’s in the way we employ our bodies in worship. Listen to what Paul says in Romans 12:1.

“I appeal to you, therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship.”—Romans 12:1

One | The presented body

This power-packed verse is among one of the very first Bible verses that a new believer, young in his faith, is encouraged to memorize. And with good reason. Old Testament law required a guy to regularly and repeatedly present for sacrifice the best of his best—bull, goat, lamb, dove—in order to be absolved of his sins and be in right standing with God. But when Jesus came along—God's Son—and died on the cross as the ultimate sacrifice for our sins, He fulfilled that requirement once and for all. So now Paul, writing to the believers in Rome, uses that ritual of sacrifice as a picture of what our response to God’s free gift of grace should look like. Every day we present ourselves, our bodies, to God. “I’m yours,” we say. “God, I am so grateful for your gift of grace, and this is one way that I can give back to you.”

Two | The living sacrifice

This is the ultimate oxymoron. “Sacrifice” implies death. So how can anything be a “living sacrifice”? The answer is pretty straightforward. We serve as living sacrifices whenever we give up our time and direct our activity toward serving the Lord. Brainstorm a list of all the ways you might serve God.

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Help a neighbor with a project.
  • Take a meal to a struggling friend.
  • Mentor your son using the scripture.
  • Join other believers in “corporate worship” through song.
  • Carve out time each day to read and ponder God’s Word.
  • Dedicate some vacation time to serve on a mission trip.
  • Take a friend to lunch and ask them if you can pray for something in their life.
  • Tell the story of how you came to know Christ and the difference he has made in your life.
  • Assess your skills and talents and find ways to use them for God’s glory. Love cabinetry? Build a bookcase for a brother. Handy at plumbing? Fix that leak in the church kitchen. Enjoy hiking? Lead a group of kids on a weekend retreat.

Okay, you get the idea. We can serve God with our hands, our bodies, our mouths, our brains—the list of possible “how-to's” is endless. The point is that we intentionally, every day, “sacrifice” our time and effort in ways that serve others and build God’s kingdom.

Three | The holy and acceptable offering

This is a matter of stewardship.

God has given us our bodies and our minds, and so the ball is in our court to take care of them as best we can. In this fallen world we are, of course, subject to all manner of frailties and imperfections. But with a little imagination and creativity, even our weaknesses can be employed to glorify God. But be aware—it’s not enough just to take care of ourselves physically. We also must nurture and care for our hearts and minds, too.

Philippians 4:8 says this:

“Finally brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.”

We are responsible to present our best selves to God. All of us. Our hands, feet, eyes, thoughts, actions – everything. And praise God that He has given us His Holy Spirit to empower us, guide us, strengthen us every step of the way.

Vince-Miller-Bio-Pic-2019

Vince Miller is an author and speaker to men around the world on topics that include manhood, masculinity, fatherhood, mentorship, and leadership. He has authored 18 different books for men and is hosted on major video platforms like RightNow Media and Faithlife TV. He hosts a weekly podcast, writes weekly articles, and provides daily thoughts from God's Word all just for men. He is a 27-year ministry veteran and the founder of Resolute a Men's Ministry Platform that provides bible studies aimed at building better men found at www.beresolute.org. See his latest book and small group study Called to Act: 5 Uncomplicated Disciplines for Men.

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